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Latin Prefixes, roots and suffixes in english

Latin was the language spoken by the ancient Romans. As the Romans conquered most of Europe, the Latin language spread throughout the region. Over time, the Latin spoken in different areas developed into separate languages, including Italian, French, Spanish, and Portuguese. These languages are considered “sisters,” as they all descended from Latin, their “mother” language.

Linguists estimate that some 60% of our common everyday English vocabulary today comes from French. Thus, many Latin words came into English indirectly through French.

Many Latin words came into English directly, though, too. Monks from Rome brought religious vocabulary as well as Christianity to England beginning in the 6th century. From the Middle Ages onward many scientific, scholarly, and legal terms were borrowed from Latin.

During the 17th and 18th centuries, dictionary writers and grammarians generally felt that English was an imperfect language whereas Latin was perfect. In order to improve the language, they deliberately made up a lot of English words from Latin words. For example, fraternity, from Latin fraternitas, was thought to be better than the native English word brotherhood.

Many English words and word parts can be traced back to Latin and Greek. This latin prefixes and suffixes table, we list some common Latin roots, latin prefixes numbers and suffixes.

You can also check out this post on common Latin words in English language

Prefixes

The following table gives a list of Latin prefixes worksheet and their basic meanings.

The following table gives a list of Latin prefixes worksheet and their basic meanings.

Latin prefix

Basic meaning

Example words

co-

Together

coauthor, coedit, coheir

de-

away, off; generally indicates reversal or removal in English

deactivate, debone, defrost, decompress, deplane

dis-

not, not any

disbelief, discomfort, discredit, disrepair, disrespect

inter-

between, among

international, interfaith, intertwine, intercellular, interject

non-

Not

nonessential, nonmetallic, nonresident, nonviolence, nonskid, nonstop

post-

After

postdate, postwar, postnasal, postnatal

pre-

Before

preconceive, preexist, premeditate, predispose, prepossess, prepay

re-

again; back, backward

rearrange, rebuild, recall, remake, rerun, rewrite

sub-

Under

submarine, subsoil, subway, subhuman, substandard

trans-

across, beyond, through

transatlantic, transpolar

 

Suffixes and root

Words and word roots may also combine with suffixes. Here are examples of some important English suffixes that come from Latin

Latin suffix

Basic meaning

Example words

-able, -ible

forms adjectives and means “capable or worthy of”

likable, flexible

-ation

forms nouns from verbs

creation, civilization, automation, speculation, information

-fy, -ify

forms verbs and means “to make or cause to become”

purify, acidify, humidify

-ment

forms nouns from verbs

entertainment, amazement, statement, banishment

-ty, -ity

forms nouns from adjectives

subtlety, certainty, cruelty, frailty, loyalty, royalty; eccentricity, electricity, peculiarity, similarity, technicality

 

 

Latin root

Basic meaning

Example words

-dict-

to say

contradict, dictate, diction, edict, predict

-duc-

to lead, bring, take

deduce, produce, reduce

-gress-

to walk

digress, progress, transgress

-ject-

to throw

eject, inject, interject, project, reject, subject

-pel-

to drive

compel, dispel, impel, repel

-pend-

to hang

append, depend, impend, pendant, pendulum

-port-

to carry

comport, deport, export, import, report, support

-scrib-, -script-

to write

describe, description, prescribe, prescription, subscribe, subscription, transcribe, transcription

-tract-

to pull, drag, draw

attract, contract, detract, extract, protract, retract, traction

-vert-

to turn

convert, divert, invert, revert

 

Others

Here are some more Latin prefixes that you can commonly find in English Language

Prefix

Meaning

Example

a, an

without, not

asexual, amoral, anarchy, anhydrous, Anabaptist, anachronism

ab, abs, a

apart, away from

abnormal, abduct, abductor (muscle), abscission .See ad in Prefixes,

Ad

toward

adhere, adductor (muscle) . See ab in Prefixes section), adumbrate

Agree

act

agent, agency, agenda

amphi, ambi

round, both sides

amphitheater, amphibian, ambidextrous, ambivalent

Ante

before

antedate, anteroom, antecedent, anterior

Anthro

man

anthropology, anthropomorphic

Anti

against

antipathy, antitank, anticlimax

Aqua

water

aquarium, aqueous

archaios

ancient

archeology, archetype, archaic, archeozoic

Archos

leader, first, chief

monarchy, oligarchy, anarchy, archetype, architect

Audio

hear

audiophile, audiometer, auditory

Auto

self

automatic, automaton, auto-immune

Bi

two

bi-partisan, bisexual, biennial, binary, bicuspid, bivalve

Bene

well, favorable

benefit, benevolent, benefactor, beneficent

Bible

book

bibliography, Bible, bibliophile

Bio

life

biology, biography, bio-active

Caco

Bad

cacophony

Cide

kill

homicide, parricide, germicidal, ecocide

Circum

around

circumference, circumlocution, circumnavigate

constitutus

stand

constitution, statute

Corpus

body

corpse, corporeal punishment, corpus callosum

Cracy

rule

democracy, theocrat, technocracy

Credo

belief

credit, (see also roots section)

Demos

people

democracy, demographic

Di

two, double

dimorphism, dicotyledon, diatomic

Dia

across, through

diagonal, dialectic, dialogue, diagnosis

Dis

not, apart

disperse, disinherit, disenfranchise, distend

dominus

lord

dominant, dominion

dynasthai

be able

dynamic, dynamo, dynasty, dynamite

Ego

I, self

ego, egomaniac, egocentric,

 

Epi

upon, over

epidermis, epidemic, epigram, epitaph, epithet, epiphyte, epistasis, epinephrine, epiphysis

Ex

out

exotic, exterior, extraneous, extemporaneous, exophalmic, exogenous, exothermic, exoskeleton

federis

league, pact

federation, confederate

Frater

brother

fraternize, fraternity, fraternal, fratricide

Geo

earth

geology, geography, geocentric, geomancy

Graph

write, record

graphic, graphite, graphology,

Hetero

mixed, unlike

heterogeneous, heterosexual, heterodox, heterodont, hetero atom, heterocyclic, heterozygous,

Homo

same, alike

homogeneous, homogenized, homozygous, homolytic fission, Homo sapiens, homonid, homeostasis

Idem

the same

identity, idiopathic, I, individual

Ideo

idea

ideology, ideation, ideal

Idios

one’s own

idiom, idiosyncrasy, idiopathic

In

in

incarcerate, incorporate, inculcate, induction, inductance, indigenous, indicator, inspiration

in, im

not

incredible, ignoble, inglorious, inhospitable, infinite, infinitesimal, immoral

 

SOURCES

Latin Roots, Prefixes, and Suffixes – InfoPlease. https://www.infoplease.com/arts-entertainment/writing-and-language/latin-roots-prefixes-and-suffixes

50 Common latin words in english you should know

Latin is one of the oldest and most ancient languages to exist in history. While there may not be cities and countries full of people speaking Latin these days, that doesn’t mean the ancient language is something you can just forget about. Not only are many of our words in English (not to mention many other languages) derived from Latin, but many of its words and phrases are still used in today’s daily speaking and writing.

About sixty percent of the English language comes from Latin. You would be surprised the number of words, and which words exactly have their origins from Latin. Out of the large number, we compiled quite a few.  Here are 50 Latin words in English translation, their definitions and the English derivatives.

If you’re interested in more about the connection of the English language and Latin, check out this article on Latin prefixes.

You can as well challenge yourself further to think of more English words that may have come from these Latin roots, and then check a dictionary to confirm the derivation.

Latin Words in English Language

Latin Word

Definition

English Derivatives

Villa

villa, house

villa, village, villager

Alta

tall, high, deep

altitude, altimeter, alto

Antiqua

antique, old

antique, antiquity, ancient

Longa

Long

longitude, longevity, long

Magna

large, great

magnify, magnificent, magnitude

Picture

Picture

picture, picturesque, pictorial

Nova

New

novice, novel, novelty, nova, Nova Scotia

Terra

land, earth

terrier, terrace, terrestrial, terrain

Prima

First

prime, primary, primitive, primeval

Sub

Under

subway, subterranean, suburban

Corna

Horn

cornucopia, cornet, clavicorn

Est

Is

estate, establish, essence

Habere

Have

have, habit, habitual

Casa

small house

Casino

Via

Street

via

Parva

Small

parval, parvanimity

Lata

wide, broad

latitude, lateral, latitudinal

Bona

Good

bonus, bonanza, bona fide

Copia

Plenty

copious, cornucopia, copiously

Fama

Fame

fame, famous, infamous

Provincial

Province

province, provincial, provincialism

Multa

Many

multitude, multiple, multiplex

Nominare

to name

nominate, nominal, name, nominative

Postea

Later

postlude, postgraduate, posthumous

Non

Not

nonfction, nonmetal, nonexistent

In

In

In

Aqua

Water

aquatics, aquarium, aqueduct, aqueous

Agricola

Farmer

Agriculture

Bestia

Beast

bestial, bestiality

Figura

figure, shape

figure, figurine, figment, figurative

Flamma

Flame

flame, flamboyant, flambeau

Herba

Herb

herb, herbivorous, herbage

Insula

Island

insular, insulate, insularity

Lingua

Language

language, lingual, linguistics

Nauta

Sailor

nautical, nautilus

Pirate

Pirate

pirate, piratical

Schola

School

scholar, school, scholastic

Alba

White

albino, albinism albumen

Amica

Friendly

amicable, amicability, amity

Beata

Happy

beatific, beatify, beatitude

Maritima

Sea

Maritime

Mea

Me

me, my

Mira

Strange

miracle, miraculous, mirage

Nota

Noted

noted, note, notice, notable, noticeable

Obscura

Dark

obscure, obscured, obscurity

Periculosa

Dangerous

perilous, peril

Propinqua

near to

propinquity

Pulchra

Beautiful

pulchritude

Quieta

Quiet

quiet, quietude, disquiet

Circum

Around

circumstance, circumnavigate, circumspect

 

Here are a few more words to add to the list;

Latin Word

Definition

English Derivatives

folium

leaf

foliage, foliaceous, foliar

aureus

golden

aurorial, aurorean, aurous

plumbeus

leaden

plumbing, plumbous, plumbic, plumbeous

mutare

to change

mutation, commute, transmute

vulnerare

to wound

vulnerable, invulnerable, vulnerary

vitare

to avoid

inevitable, inevitably, inevitability

morbus

disease

morbid, morbidity, morbific

populus

people

populous, population, popular

radius

ray

radius, radial, radiation

arma

arms (weapons)

arms, armed, armament, army

saxum

rock

saxatile, saxicoline, saxifrage

 

SOURCES

        50 Common Latin Phrases Every College Student Should Know. https://practicalpages.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/50-common-latin-phrases-every-college-student-should-know.pdf

        English Vocabulary Derived from Latin – Page 4. http://www.enhancemyvocabulary.com/word-roots_latin_4.html

Best analogies examples for kids

In its simplest form, an analogy refers to the comparison of two objects or things based on their similarities. The objects being compared usually have clear similarities while sometimes they are quite different from each other but have some linking attributes. An analogy is using an object to explain another object based on their likeliness.

We make use of analogies daily. We refer to them as idioms or figures of speech. Analogies are great learning tools for kids. It makes learning the similarities between words easier and smoother for them. Kids learn best through the use of images. Just like idioms for kids, they improve logical reasoning skills

For example, John knows what hate is but he is not familiar with the word dislike. An analogy will compare hate to dislike, making it easy for John to remember and commit to memory the meaning of the word ‘dislike’.

Analogies Examples for Kids

There are a lot of analogies examples for kids, only the most relevant ones have been selected. All words and things can be explained by using an analogy. By comparing two objects, the similarities and meaning become clear. The analogies worksheets for kids is just what they need to make meaning of new words and concepts.

Examples of Word Analogies

This type of analogy is the simplest to learn for kids. It is the comparison of two words side by side to show their relationship. They are common learning tests for Kids standardized Grammar Tests. Examples of word analogies include:

Tree: Leaf :: Flower: Petal

It is written as “tree is to leaf as a flower is to petal”.

This analogy shows the relationship between these two concepts. A leaf is to a tree what petal is to a flower.

In a test, one part is intentionally left blank and kids are asked to fill in the gap:

____ : Leaf:: Flower: Petal

 

Another Example:

Sheep : Lamb :: Fowl : _______

To find the missing word, you have to first identify the relationship between the known words (Sheep : Lamb). Sheep is the adult animal while Lamb is the baby animal. Once you discover this, the missing word becomes clearer. The answer is the baby animal for fowl which is chick.

Sheep: Lamb :: Fowl : _________

There is no limit to the number of words for comparison. Everything is comparable, all it takes is to find the relationship. Here are some other examples of word analogies:

  • Short : Dark :: Tall : Light
  • Like: Dislike :: Love: Hate
  • Up : Down :: High : Low
  • Pen : Writer :: Hoe : Farmer
  • Chef : Food :: Plumber : Pipes
  • Speak : Sing :: Walk : Dance
  • Window : House :: Door : Mansion
  • Dog : Puppy :: Pig : Piglet
  • Night : Moon :: Day : Sun
  • Bird : Feather :: Sheep :: Wool
  • Oven : Hot :: Fridge : Cold
  • Write : Wrote : Lie : Lied
  • Car : Fuel :: Aeroplane : Diesel
  • Boat : River :: Car : Road
  • Frown : Smile :: Ugly : Pretty
  • Mammal : Man :: Reptile : Lizard
  • Fruit : Cherry :: Vegetable : Spinach
  • Cooking : Kitchen :: Sleeping : Bedroom
  • Act : Actor :: Draw : Artist
  • Scissors : Cut :: Biro : Write
  • Ear : Sound :: Nose : Aroma
  • Track : Athletic :: Swimming Pool : Swimming
  • Court : Tenis :: Field : Football
  • Ball : Football :: Egg : Tennis
  • Frying : Egg :: Boiling : Water
  • Man : Women :: Nephew : Niece
  • Aunt : Uncle :: Grand mother : Grandfather
  • Snail : Crawl :: Toad : Hop
  • Soccer : Referee :: Baseball : Umpire
  • Pack : Wolf :: School : Fish
  • School : Student :: Office : Worker
  • Dry : Desert :: Wet : Ocean
  • Eat : Hungry :: Sleep : Tired

The above examples make analogies learning for kids easy. Kids relate to new words and their meanings better with analogies. It also boosts their logical reasoning skills.

The Relationship between Analogy, Metaphor, and Simile

They all have striking resemblance but they are not the same. Analogy, Metaphor, and Simile compare two things together. Metaphor and Smile are figures of speech while the analogy is not a figure of speech but used for making logical arguments.

Simile

We extract most of our analogies from the figure of speech ‘Simile’. A simile compares two things using words such as “as” and “like”. For example:

  • Simile: As Stubborn as a Goat, as brave as a lion
  • Word Analogy: Stubborn : Goat :: Brave : Lion

Metaphor

It compares two things directly without using comparison words such as “as” and “like”. We can also extract word analogies from Metaphor. For example:

  • Metaphor: He is a diamond in rough.
  • Word Analogy: Diamond : Rough

These analogies for kids are vital keys to understanding new words and meanings. Analogies find connections between words and emphasizes it for kids and general learning.

First grade spelling words list

The 1st Grade is a fundamentally important time in the education of any child. It’s the very foundation of learning, and whatever happens here pretty much determines a lot about a child’s future. The same goes for spelling.

Your first graders need to start on the right track with their spelling. This post contains a first grade vocabulary words list that is sure to do the trick. You can also download the first grade vocabulary words PDF

Your kids will benefit from the first grade vocabulary words with definitions, possibly written on the printed PDF above.

Be sure to check out our other spelling lists; like the 5th Grade Spelling Words list.

Spelling List 1

bat
tooth
spin
fox
sick
pig
ran
your
cut
way
hut
rose
she
bug
brick
people
sun
must
bell
bone
sell
glad
mug
low
have
tuck
part
play

Spelling list 2

kick
an
water
bat
duck
dry
hop
by
note
when
cap
their
big
mob
time
write
up
all
sob
name
hook
each
on
for
must
pit
come
down

Spelling List 3

pet
her
soak
pin
sky
web
can
snow
you
fun
shut
some
thing
to
try
sit
hat
one
rug
cry
soap
trip
stuck
nose
are
plow

Spelling List 4

into
show
hot
which
first
so
oil
pan
nut
coat
hen
page
tape
sat
about
he
ten
boat
these
said
they
find
pot
stop
two
tray
ship
took

Spelling list 5

out
set
mom
legs
like
now
map
moon
at
it
shop
may
pen
fit
bit
but
rock
skin
lip
truck
had
bed
black
made
day
less
grow
how

Spelling List 6

tree
red
then
float
thin
fell
shy
cat
clock
number
kid
get
clay
we
job
town
see
that
this
code
called
many
make
race
them
mad
were
of

Spelling List 7

was
stick
him
my
who
hug
look
what
time
nap
wet
in
not
sack
with
shell
do
back
bow
bad
could
bat
hole
pop
sled
cup
ant
will

Spelling list 8

block
other
cow
well
man
wig
game
mat
pay
as
mop
not
let
hit
snack
been
use
wood
words
sock
from
roof
bun
luck
his
win
be
tan

Spelling List 9

no
go
fed
pool
chop
would
tame
has
dig
there
tell
cob
and
dog
drop
or
spoon
stay
run
load
lot
ink
more
flow
rut
is
shake
long

More Words For Your First Grader

coat
come
cook
cool
corn
could
cram
crew
crib
crow
crowd
crown
cube
dark
deal
desk
dew
dime
dine
dirt
doll
door
draw
dress
drink
drop
dull
each
east

easy
into
jaw
joke
juice
jump
just
keep
king
kite
know
last
lake
late
like
lime
line
live
look
love
luck
made
maid
make
many

 

sink
shake
shirt
ship
shoes
shop
show
shut
sick
side
size
sled
sleep
them
then
there
think
those
tree
under
upon
use
used
very
vest
vote

map
mask
may
meal
meat
meet
round
rub
rubber
sail
sale
same
sank
save
see
seed
seen
seep
sell
send
seven
shall
shape

wait
walk
want
was
water

well
were
west
when
which
white
who
will
wing
winter
with
woman
eight
eleven
end
every
fang
farther
fast
men
mice
milk
mine
mint
mix
moon
slip
slow
sister
smell
snail
snap
snore
women
yell
zero
zone

10 interesting ways to learn new words of any language

As a language learner, you work hard to expand your vocabulary. You plough through new words every day, make long lists of words and practice with flashcards. However, when it comes to speaking, the new words seem to fall out of your head, so you resort to your old friends – words you already know and have used many times – again and again.

Remembering and using new words in speech is often a challenge for language learners.

“How do I improve my vocabulary?” is probably one of the biggest questions asked in English Language. The quest for new words really is a widespread one, and it’s often thought to be quite tasking. It shouldn’t be.

We’ve come up with some pretty easy ways to improve and expand the list of words you use in English.

Why expand your knowledge and use of words? What benefits could you possibly gain from improving your vocabulary? The possibilities and benefits are limitless. First off, when you learn new words daily you’ll be able to communicate better, your speaking and writing become considerably better. Whatever you’re trying to pass across will be put more clearly and using less words. People will also understand you more easily, and you will understand more. Learning new words everyday is a fun activity — and one you can even do with the people around you. Challenge a friend, family member, or roommate to learn new words each day with you. Here’s how!

10 Ways To Learn New Words In Any Language

Here are ten strategies to help you make words stick in your mind

Read, read, and read.

The more you read — especially novels, but also magazines and newspapers — the more words you’ll learn. As you read and uncover new words, try to work out the  meaning from the sentence as well as from looking up the definition in a dictionary. Write down new words. Your vocabulary will sky rocket!

Keep a dictionary and thesaurus handy.

Use whatever versions you prefer — in print, software, or online. A good quality dictionary is one hundred times better than google translate, and electronic ones are quick! When you uncover a new word, look it up in the dictionary to get both its pronunciation and its meaning(s). Next, go to the thesaurus and find similar words and phrases — and their opposites (synonyms and antonyms).

Build your own dictionary.

It’s a very good idea to write down the new words you discover. Just by writing them down you will start to recognize the words when you read. Plus, keeping a dictionary of all your new words will give you the confidence to learn even more words — especially when you can see how many new words you’ve already learnt. You can also use them in sentences.

Additionally, instead of keeping these sentences to yourself, you can use them in writing games such as the Folding Story. This is an online version of the popular writing game where each player writes one line of a story and passes it on to another player to add to it. In the online version, each player gets just three minutes to write a line and scores points by the number of likes they receive for their lines.

Learn a word a day.

Using a word a day calendar, a website, or develop your own list of words to learn. This is a great technique many people use to learn new words. Don’t feel you must learn a new word every day.

Play some games.

Word games that challenge you and help you discover new meanings and new words are a great tool for expanding your vocabulary. Examples include crossword puzzles, anagrams, word jumble, Scrabble, and Boggle. The perception of a challenge stimulates the brain. Games that help you discover new meanings and new words are a fun way to expand your vocabulary. You can find tons of quizzes and games on Quizlet.com

Engage in conversations.

Simply talking with other people can help you learn discover new words. As with reading, once you hear a new word, remember to jot it down so that you can study it later — and then slowly add the new word to your vocabulary.

You hold the key to a better vocabulary. By using the tips from this article, you should be well on your way to discovering and learning new words to expand your vocabulary and strengthen your use of the English language. Finally, remember that you must practice putting your new words into your writing and speaking so that you continue to remember them.

You could join an online community of language learners such as The Polyglot Club, where you can ask questions and practice with native speakers from all over the world.

No random words

We remember what is relevant to us. Making lists or index cards with random words is not usually an effective way to remember and use these words later. Word lists and index cards are great for revisiting vocabulary you have already learned, but to make a new word stick in your mind, try linking it with something meaningful to you. You will be more likely to remember a new word if it is used in a context you find interesting or are passionate about. For example, if you are a football fan, there are more chances you will remember the word ‘unstoppable’ in a sentence, such as ‘Messi is unstoppable’, rather than just as a single word or in a generic sentence, e.g. ‘Some people are unstoppable’.

Sites like the The British Council LearnEnglish website have tons of interactive videos, games and podcasts. No matter what topic interests you, you will always find something there. There are also discussion boards under activities, so you can share your ideas with other learners.

Learn in chunks and scripts

We retain words better when we learn them in small ‘chunks’ (i.e. small phrases that combine several words) and ‘scripts’ (i.e. typical dialogues). For example, instead of memorizing the phrasal verb ‘to come up with’, memorize it as part of the phrase ‘to come up with an idea’. This way, you make sure that you know how to actually use this verb in at least one sentence. Similarly, instead of memorizing 33 ways of saying ‘hello’, learn it in a script, such as: ‘Hello, how are you? – I’m fine, thank you’.

If you don’t mind learning with video, TV and films, try FluentU. There are interactive captions, so if you tap on any word, you will see an image, definition and useful examples. You can also find other interesting resources featuring words in context. For example, the ‘SpeakSmart’ collection on Instagram has different scenes from popular television series giving examples of particular words and phrases in use. If you love reading, try reading short texts, such as cartoon strips. There are many comics available online, including those for language learners, like Grammarman, which you can also listen to while you read.

Dive deeper into etymology

Before you look up the word in the dictionary, try to guess what it means. Look at its root, suffixes and prefixes. If you know a few languages, you will start recognising new words that share roots. Researching the origin of new words may help you retain new words better.

For example, did you know that the word ‘tea’ comes from Chinese ‘t’e’ (Amoy dialect), which corresponds to Mandarin ‘ch’a’? The English word ‘tea’ (just as in French, Spanish or Germqan) derives from the Amoy form (through the Dutch East India Company that introduced the leaves to Europe). Meanwhile, Russian chai (just as in Serbian, Persian, Greek, Arabic and Turkish) all came overland from the Mandarin form. Now, whenever you hear ‘tea’ or ‘chai’, you will see a lovely cup of steaming tea and know how it got to the country.

If you are looking for the origin of idioms or individual words, the Online Etymology Dictionary may be quite helpful.

Create mnemonics

Try to create a funny phrase or story that will strengthen the connection between the word and its meaning (known as a mnemonic). I find this technique especially effective when I need to recall words that are hard to spell.

Here are a few mnemonics created by my students:

‘career’ – car and beer

‘island’ – is land

‘to lose’ – uh-oh, I’ve lost an ‘o’

There are a lot of mnemonics available online, such as the ‘mems’ created by users in Memrise, but you will have a better chance of remembering the word if you invent your own.

Now that you’ve discovered how to learn new words in any language and improve your vocabulary, check out these new words in english.

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Printable crossword puzzles for kids

Printable Crossword Puzzles for Kids

Crossword Puzzles for middle school students are an easy and exciting way for students to familiarize themselves with new concepts, a particular subject or topic and just to have fun. They are similar to the context clue games because they require brainpower and offers tremendous learning benefits for students. Crossword Puzzles for Middle School online are an effective learning resource to try out for kids.

Crossword Puzzles for Middle School Students

  1. Bodies of Water Crossword

This is a more challenging crossword puzzle with no answers. Hints are provided to help kids find the appropriate body of water needed for each puzzle box. There are over 18 unique water bodies names students stand to discover from this puzzle.

         2. Chemistry Crossword

Do you love Chemistry? Do you consider yourself a Chemistry ‘guru’? This Chemistry Crossword Puzzle is just right for you. It has 32 clues to help you fill in the boxes. It is going to take a while to complete so brace yourself for the fun challenge.

       3.The First Forty Elements Crossword

Do you know first forty elements on the periodic table? This crossword puzzle for middle school online is designed for you. Mastery is made easy with this exciting crossword puzzle.

       4. Our Solar System Crossword

This puzzle contains information about our solar system, every essential detail you need to know.  There are 14 boxes for you to fill from the hints provided. Have fun!

         5. State Capital Crossword

Do you know the capitals of all the states in the United States of America? If yes, put that knowledge to test by trying out this crossword puzzle of state capitals. If no, what’s stopping you from learning? The challenging crossword has 47 hints, all you have to do is fit them in their appropriate boxes.

This Crossword Puzzles for Middle School pdf printable which has five puzzles is a challenging and fun learning activity for students. Have fun!

30 Cool idioms for kids with meaning

Idioms are word combinations that have a different figurative meaning than the literal meanings of each word or phrase. They can be confusing for kids or people learning a language as they don’t usually mean what they say.

Take for example a sentence such as “He’s as cool as a cucumber”. It is probably one of the most used types of idiom, considered to be an everyday idiom, but honestly if you’ve never quite heard it before or if you’re just a kid, you might be wondering why a person is a cold fruit (or vegetable?) and what all this has to do with the state of things. However, ‘calm as a cucumber’ simply means “he’s very calm”. What a fun way to say something, right?

Well, we’ve compiled a huge list of common examples of idioms for good kids, 30 of them; for kids to learn and become more familiar with these these crazy, creative phrases. Have your kids use  these idioms for new kids to express yourself in an interesting way.

While you’re at it, you can also check out our analogies for kids.

Here are the idioms for kids with definition

Animal Idioms

Kids will love these types of idioms the most. They are idioms involving or containing animals to carry out the expression. You most likely have heard of most of them before.

A bull in a china shop – Someone who is very clumsy

A little birdie told me – Someone told me a secret

Bee in her bonnet – She is upset

Birdbrain – Someone who is not very smart

Busy as a bee – To be very active and working hard at something

Cat got your tongue? – Why aren’t you talking?

Cry crocodile tears – To pretend to be upset

Curiosity killed the cat – Asking too many questions may get you in trouble

Different kettle of fish – Something completely different

Doggy bag – A bag to take home leftovers from a restaurant

Fish out of water – Being somewhere you don’t belong

For the birds – Something that is not worth anything

Get off your high horse – Quit thinking you are better than others

Goose is cooked – Now you’re in trouble

Hold your horses – Wait a minute

Horse of a different color – Something that is quite different, a separate issue

Hot dog – A person doing athletic stunts that are dangerous

Let the cat out of the bag – Tell a secret

Make a mountain out of a molehill – Make something unimportant into a big deal

Night owl – Someone who stays up late

Pig out – To eat a lot

Put a bug in his ear – Make a suggestion

Raining cats and dogs – It is raining very hard

Snail’s pace – To move extremely slow

Stir a hornet’s nest – To cause a lot of trouble

Teacher’s pet – The teacher’s favorite student

The world is your oyster – You can achieve whatever/go wherever you want

When pigs fly – To say something is impossible

Wolf in sheep’s clothing – A person who pretends to be nice but is not

You can’t teach an old dog new tricks – It’s harder for older people to learn new things

We’ve added other types of idioms for kids to enjoy learning about and use too

Everyday Idioms

These idioms are ones that can be used in day to day activities, and you’ll find that they are very common

A grey area – Something unclear

A rip-off – Too expensive

Add fuel to the fire – To add more to an existing problem

As easy as ABC – Something is very easy

Call it a day – Time to quit

Cool as a cucumber – To be very calm under stress

Crack a book – Open up a book and study

Down to the wire – At the last minute

Draw a blank – Can’t remember

Fill in the blanks – Provide more information

Get a kick out of it – Really enjoy/like something

Get your act together – Behave properly

Give it a shot – To try to do something

Have mixed feelings – Be unsure of how you feel

Have second thoughts – Have doubts

In hot water – Be in trouble

In the same boat – Be in the same situation

It’s in the bag – It’s a certainty

I’ve got your number – To say you can’t be fooled by someone since you have them figured out

Miss the boat – You missed your chance

Mumbo jumbo – To call something total nonsense

Out of the blue – With no warning

Pass with flying colors – To succeed at something easily

Piece of cake – Something very easy

Read between the lines – Find the hidden meaning

Second to none – The best

The icing on the cake – Something additional that turns good into great

Body Part Idioms

These idioms have to do with parts of the body.

Cross your fingers – For good luck

Fell on deaf ears – People wouldn’t listen to something

Get cold feet – Be nervous

Giving the cold shoulder – Ignore someone

Have a change of heart – Changed your mind

I’m all ears – You have my full attention

It cost an arm and a leg – It was expensive

Play it by ear – Improvise

See eye to eye – Agree

Slipped my mind – I forgot

Speak your mind – Say what you really feel

Additionally, we’ve thrown in a few food related idioms to humor you a bit. Enjoy!

Food Idioms

As busy as popcorn on a skillet – Very active.

As flat as a pancake – Very flat.

As sour as vinegar – Disagreeable person.

As sweet as honey – Very sweet person.

Have a sweet tooth – Love for sugary and sweet foods.

Like taking candy from a baby – Easy to do.

Salt of the Earth – Ordinary and decent people.

Sell like hotcakes – Sell quickly and in large amounts.

Sugarcoat – Gloss over bad information.

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10 Aweomse ways to improve your vocabulary at home

A good grasp of vocabulary is a handy tool for communicating and expressing your thoughts and ideas. Improving your vocabulary from home is just one phase of language learning you have to work on, other phases include proper use of grammar and punctuation. Improving your vocabulary helps you learn how to spell better.

Vocabulary refers to all the words that form a language. It is almost impossible to know all the words in the English language. There is no need to go through the laborious and unproductive exercise of cramming all the words in the dictionary. What you need is to familiarize yourself with popularly used words.

It is a powerful tool to communicate effectively. Every word has a unique meaning. For example, ‘love’ and ‘like’ are synonyms but they also have different meanings.

Like – Affection for an individual.

Love – Strong affection for an individual.

It is not correct to say ‘I like my daddy’ when what you feel is a strong affection for your dad.

This article helps you know when best to apply a word in writing and speech. It prevents you from using vague words and out of context words. Using wrong words conveys a different meaning to your reader or listener that is different from your original idea.

Vocabulary learning is essential if you want to become a better writer, reader, and speaker. It is an easy way to enrich your English. Learning a lot of vocabulary helps you communicate effectively to your audience. The key is to learn more than you need at a certain point in time and for every situation.  At a future date when the need arises, you will draw from your rich bank of vocabulary stored in your head.

How to improve vocabulary skills in English? There are many ways to improve vocabulary, the most common is through reading and listening. This article will focus on 10 awesome ways to improve your vocabulary from the comfort of your home.

Put new words to use immediately

This is how to improve vocabulary through listening. Every day we encounter new words, especially by listening to people, the television, or the internet, or all speak. The best way to commit these new words to memory is to put it to use immediately.

You can make a game from it, form sentences with the new words. You can even vocalize it by using it in conversations.   Repeating the new words often helps you remember. Without taking these steps, we are likely to lose the new words we got from listening.

Apart from vocalizing the new words, you can put in writing. You can practice writing beautiful sentences with new words. The combination of writing and vocalizing the new words is enough to help you remember the new words when needed.

Improve your vocabulary by reading every day

This is how to improve vocabulary through reading. Informal learning is arguably as effective as the formal type. The fact you are no longer in school doing word practices and, word drills, and reading comprehension passages does not mean you can’t do them at home.

Word drills help enhance your vocabulary. Your reading exercises should continue at home. Pick up a good book, magazine, newspapers, or read content off the internet every day can improve your vocabulary. It does not matter if the material you read is non-fiction or fiction, both offer new words for your learning.

Reading teaches you unfamiliar words. A good written sentence or paragraph will give you the wrong idea of what the words mean. You will still need to consult the dictionary to know it meaning and when to use it in a sentence.

Reading every day means you will very likely encounter new words daily. Building your vocabulary daily is the right and stress-free educational exercise you can do from the comfort of your home.

Keep a thesaurus within reach

New words come to us in different situations, it is our duty to pick them up wherever they meet us. Keeping a thesaurus within hand reach is a fantastic way to ensure we do not miss out on anything.

Thanks to the internet and app development, there is a lot of thesauri to download to our mobile phones or laptops for free. You may decide to get a very good and comprehensive one for a fee. You can find suitable options from Google Store, Apple Store, or Microsoft store.

So, when next you hear or find a new word, use a dictionary to find its meaning and a thesaurus to find similar words.

A thesaurus is also a handy writing and editing tool to polish your vocabulary. It is useful if your vocabulary is not as strong and diverse as you want it. Search the words you repeat frequently in speech or writing in the thesaurus and learn suitable alternatives.

It is quicker and smarter than waiting for someone to encounter it from someone’s lips or writings.

When using a thesaurus, double-check if the new word you want to use as a replacement for a familiar word fits the context you want to use it for.

For example, if you use a thesaurus to look for alternatives for the word ‘smile’, you will see words like beam and grin. Grin means to smile widely or broadly, may not fit the type of smile you want to express if it is a short and quick smile. You are better off sticking to the word ‘smile’.

Learn Practical Words

This means you learn words that are practical to your needs. Most people have bad approaches to vocabulary learning. They learn words that have no relation to what they say and do. These words are often technical and without regular usage, it’s easy to forget.

Words are meant to express the ideas you want in your mind to the reader or listener. You have not done a good job at communication if the other person cannot deduce from what you said or write what you mean.

The better approach is to learn new words that have practical usage for you. Learn new words that you can actively use in conversations. Words that clearly express what you want to say or write.

A good example is learning practical new words for your conversations and hobbies. If you are love swimming and frequent the pool regularly, expand your vocabulary on swimming. If you love to cook and enjoy watching cooking shows, improve your vocabulary on cooking. This way you will not only learn new vocabulary but make them a part of you with regular usage.

 

Record New Words

We encounter new vocabularies in our daily engagement, the sad news is that we lose more than half of it because we do not document it. How many new words have we heard and how many do we remember? I am certain there’s no way you can put an exact figure to it.

We lose a lot of new words from your carefree attitude to documenting them. We put too much confidence in our capacity to remember. Guess what? We are humans and one thing we do so well, almost effortlessly, is to forget.

Everyone has faced a situation where they want to use a particular word, they know is appropriate for the context, but they cannot remember the word even with hard, vein-pulling thinking.

Instead of committing to memory and forgetting, buy a journal or a writing pad to jot down new vocabularies you learned from listening or reading.

If you do not fancy keeping a hardcopy journal, you can download a journal app and use it.

Your journal is more than a place to list all the new words you learned. Try and use these new words to form interesting sentences. This is a fantastic way to improve your vocabulary.

Play Word Puzzle Games

Word puzzles are a fun and engaging way to build your vocabulary. It is a game where you attempt to solve the word puzzles by putting the right words in the appropriate spaces. There are clues to help you find the word.

There are available in different formats, you can get the online word puzzle or the offline word puzzles. The offline word puzzles are those in magazines and newspapers. The online word puzzles are those found on the internet. There is a multitude of apps and word puzzle resources for you to pick from on the internet.

They offer fun and practical vocabulary learning. The crossword puzzle is a more complex type of word puzzle and great for improving your vocabulary.

I recommend you sacrifice the joy of a high score and play difficult word puzzle games that contain unfamiliar words to put your brain to test. 

Play Word Board and Non-Board Games

Another fun and exciting way to improve your vocabulary is to play word board games. These games put your word mastery to test. If you are looking for a practical, effective, and fun way to improve your vocabulary, try out any word board game you can lay your hands on.

The game market is saturated with a lot of word board games. These games are not unfamiliar to you, as a child you played word board games. It won’t hurt to act like a child and play them (the more advanced versions).

The word board game I recommend and enjoy playing is the Scramble. Whoever invented that game has a special place in my heart. It has helped me and many others improve our vocabulary. You can play it with up to three players. Challenge your friends to a game night and collectively build your vocabularies.

If you do not enjoy the board word games or find it too childish, there are a lot of non-board word games you can try out. These games are fun and interesting to play with. You can download as many as possible on your phones or laptops.

Most non-board word games allow you to compete with players from other parts of the world. There are a lot of interesting challenges you can play that improves your vocabulary.

 

Build synonym and antonym word lists

You will need a good thesaurus for this task. If you use the same words over and over again in speech and writing, it very well means your vocabulary needs improving. Grab a book with blank pages (I did not say a piece of paper) or open a writing app on your phone or system.

Write the word you use frequently on top of the page. Use a thesaurus to search for all possible synonyms and antonyms. Use a dictionary to crosscheck that the words found to match the use for that purpose. Jot down the words that fit under different headings – Synonyms and Antonyms.

Keep this little list safe and practice it often. When next you find yourself using that word over and over again, replace it with the new words you learned.

 

Use Online Writing Courses

There are a lot of institutions that offer online writing courses – free or paid. You can use Udemy, Khan Academy, Coursera, or other online courses platform to find these courses. Your vocabulary will improve tremendously if you pay attention to the teachings and do the quizzes and assignments given.

Diversify What You Read

If you read the same materials or topics every day, you will not encounter new vocabulary often. It is wonderful to read about your interests, but you also have to read widely to enrich your vocabulary.

Read on different topics such as literature, science, music, history, global news, politics, and any other combinations you find interesting. If you love reading fiction, diversify your book lists to contain different genres that talk about different topics.

Improving your vocabulary is essential to building good communication and writing skills. There is no substitute for it. Consistency is the key, start by learning a new word per day and expand as you deem fit. Practice! Practice! And more practice!

ancient greek words used in english today

With a history stretching back more than 3,500 years, the Greek language unsurprisingly offers an array of beautiful words, rich in meaning, with which to acquaint yourself. In the English-speaking world, it’s impossible to go a day without coming across at least one word of Greek origin. From the marmalade adorning our morning toasts, to the music we play and the dramas we watch at the cinema, the Ancient Greeks have thoroughly infiltrated the modern English we speak today. There are over 150,000 examples to point at. There are many varieties such as ancient Greek words for love and ancient Greek words for power.

Here are some of these Ancient Greek Words In English.

Greek Words Used In English

Kudos

To give kudos is to offer fame, glory or high recognition of achievement. Note that in American English usage, kudos can take on plural form; for example, “ He deserves many kudos for such work.”

Phobia

Contrary to popular belief, phobia isn’t just fear, it’s an irrational and exaggerated fear of something. Phobia can be associated with people, animals or situations.

Plethora

A plethora refers to an over abundance or excess; a superabundance. For example, you might say, “We have a plethora of food for this party.”

Genesis

Genesis means birth, origin or the coming into being of something, which is why the first book of the Bible is called Genesis.

Dogma

Dogma refers to a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true. Dogma is usually associated with religion, where the principles and beliefs are undisputable and authoritative. Pluralized, dogma becomes ‘dogmas’ or dogmata.

Ethos

In Greek, ethos means “accustomed place.” It is used in the English language to refer to the disposition or characteristics of a specific ideology or person.

Anemia

Anemia is a condition in which the body does not have enough healthy red blood cells, or less than the normal quantity of hemoglobin in the blood. There are over 400 types of Anemia.

Acme

Acme refers to the highest point of an achievement or development. It represents perfection of the thing expressed, for example, “He has reached the acme of his career.”

Agora

Agora comes from the word for an open market place found in many of the cities of ancient Greece. In the modern day we use this word to describe any type of open assembly or congregation.

Eureka

Founded by famous Greek mathematician, Archimedes, eureka represents a celebrated discovery. When Archimedes discovered that the water displaced by submerging a part of his body in the bath, was equal to the volume of the submerged body part,  he ran into the street shouting eureka! Eureka!

Philoxenia

This means to show love to strangers. Hospitality was considered to be one of the most virtuous qualities in ancient Greek culture, and philoxenia is the word to describe the value and respect extended towards a guest or visitor in your home or a stranger on the street. The term dates back to ancient Greece, where guests of the Spartan king abused the philoxenia shown to them by abducting the king’s wife, triggering the Trojan War.

Kapsoura

This means a burning desire. There’s no English word that captures the extent of passion and desire that kapsoura evokes. In Greek, the word denotes the kind of love that burns so ardently that it threatens to consume itself.

Philotimo

This means honour. There is no succinct definition for the Greek word philotimo. It is a powerful word used to describe individuals full of integrity and honour, encompassing the pride one takes in living a rich, considerate and meaningful life.

Petrichor

Used to describe The smell of wet earth. So untranslatable is this word that the English language has simply borrowed the term directly from Greek. Petrichor is a poetic way of describing the smell of the earth after it has rained. The word is made up of the Greek petra, meaning ‘stone’, and īchōr, the blood of the gods in Greek mythology.

Meraki

This means to do something with complete passion and love and is usually associated with a task or creative endeavour. The closest English saying is ‘labour of love’, but this has a more negative connotation. The word meraki is positive and all-consuming, with its roots found in merak, a Turkish term meaning to do something with pleasure.

Kefi

Meaning uncontrollable joy, this word describes overwhelming happiness or euphoria, or a good mood or disposition.

Palikari

This defines a young man of note. Taken from the ancient Greek pallax, which meant young man or young lad, the modern Greek word palikari is used to describe a young man who is in his prime or has achieved something great beyond his years.

Sophrosyne

Meaning healthy in both mind and body, this is nother ancient Greek word that is still in use today. Sophrosyne describes an individual who has a masterful control of both their mind and body, along with excellence of character, and is at peace with themselves.

Kairos

Meaning the right moment to act. Closely related to the Greek word for time, chronos, kairos is less a measure of the hours and years than the acknowledgement of one special moment in time. It is the idea of the ripe, perfect moment for action.

Parea

This word evokes a stage of friendship that sees companions, who simply enjoy each other’s company, get together to share their values, ideas and philosophies.

Paracosm

As used in English, comes from the ancient Greek pará, which means ‘beside’, ‘alongside’ and kósmos, meaning ‘world’, ‘universe’. This word denotes a detailed imaginary world.

Acrobat

From the word akri (“tip” or “edge”) and the verb vaino (“to walk”), an acrobat is someone who walks on the edge, often on tiptoe.

Cemetery

A lot of Greek words used in English like to disguise themselves as Old French or Latin. Don’t let looks deceive you, though: This example actually comes from the Greek word koimame which means“to sleep”, which is also the root of another word, koimitirion — “dormitory”. Is it creepy, then, that we call our final places of rest dormitories for the dead? Perhaps.

Cynicism

Cynicism comes from the Cynics, a school of Ancient Greek philosophers. Their namesake is probably derived from a public gymnasium (school) where one of Socrates’s pupils taught called Cynosarges (“white dog” or “swift dog,” depending on who you ask). According to one myth, the Athenians were in the middle of making an offering to Heracles when a dog snatched the animal and deposited it near the location where the school was later built.

Democracy

Ahh, good old democracy. Combining demos (“people”) and kratos (“power”), the meaning of this quintessential Greek word used in English is simply put: power to the people!

Dinosaur

How would you describe a dinosaur? If you came up with something similar to “fear-inspiring reptile,” congratulations. The name we use to call these magnificent, ancient creatures comes from the Greek words deinos (“terrible”) and savra (“lizard”).

Europe

According to Ancient Greek mythology, Europe was a mythological princess with big, beautiful eyes, a trait reflected in the very origins of her name: evrys (“broad”) and ops (“eye”). When the god Zeus laid his own eyes on her, it was love at first sight. He quickly transformed himself into a white bull and spirited her off to the faraway lands we now call Europe.

Galaxy

Many Greek words used in English have mythological origins. Galaxy, a.k.a. the Milky Way, comes from the Greek word for milk, gala. According to one myth, the Milky Way was created by Zeus’s baby son, Heracles, after he tried suckling on his step-mother’s milk while she slept. When Hera woke up to discover that she was breastfeeding an infant that was not her own, she pushed the child away, causing her milk to spurt into the universe.

Hermaphrodite

Hermaphrodite was the son of Hermes and Aphrodite, who apparently couldn’t be bothered with finding a new name for their child. As the most handsome man in the word, Hermaphrodite became an object of affection for the nymph Salmacis. After wishing for eternal love, the gods answered her prayers by joining the two lovers in one body.

Marathon

Thousands of long-distance footraces take place every year around the world. Officially, a marathon is 42.1 km (or 26.1 miles) long, in a nod to the actual distance between two Greek cities. Legend has it that in 490 B.C., Pheidippides ran all the way to Athens from a battlefield in Marathon to announce to the world that the Persians had been defeated at the aptly-named Battle of Marathon. After his victorious announcement, he collapsed and died. In 2010, Greece celebrated the battle’s 2,500 year jubilee with — you guessed it — a marathon.

Marmalade

Although dictionaries will tell you that the word comes from Portuguese, it in fact comes from the Greek words meli (“honey”) and milo (“apple”). Some sources say that the Ancient Greeks liked cooking quinces (marmelos in Portuguese) with honey.

Melancholy

This common Greek word used in English has a somewhat bizarre etymology. Coming from the Greek words melas (“black”) and khole (bile), it was once thought that when your spleen produces an excess of black bile, you feel gloomy. This belief is rooted in the Ancient Greek school of medicine called humorism, which hypothesized that body fluids (“humors”) directly influenced a person’s mood.

Music

Music literally means art of the Muses, the nine Greek goddesses who presided over the arts and sciences. The concept of a museum was originally intended to be a shrine for the Muses.

Narcissism

Narcissism comes from the Ancient Greek mythological figure of Narcissus, a young man who fell in love with himself when he saw his reflection in a lake. One nymph who fell passionately in love with him withered away into nothingness when he ignored her, leaving no trace behind but her voice. Her name was Echo.

Panic

The word panic comes from the name of the Ancient Greek goat-god Pan, who spread terror among nymphs like Echo..

Planet

Planet comes from the Greek verb planomai, which means “to wander.” To the Ancient Greeks, planets were simply wandering stars.

Sarcasm

From the Greek word for flesh, sarx, sarcasm describes the (metaphorical) act of stripping someone’s flesh off with a sneering comment.

Schizophrenia

Combining the words schizein (“to split”) and phren (“mind”), the meaning of this particular Greek word used in English is pretty self-explanatory.

Thespian

Thespian is a fancy word for actor, especially a theater actor. The name comes from Thespis himself, a 6th century B.C. Ancient Greek poet who was said to be the first person to ever appear on a stage as an actor.

If you’d like to learn more, here are some latin words used in english. Check them out.

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Printable kindergarten vocabulary words list

These kindergarten vocabulary words, pdf printable contain the elementary vocabularies for toddlers. Just like the Spanish Vocabulary Words, Kindergarten Vocabulary Words is an introduction to the basics of language. Without these words, further learning is impossible to achieve.

Teaching kindergarten vocabulary words with pictures makes them easy to learn, pronounce, and commit to memory. Our list consists of some simple kindergarten science vocabulary words and general words we use every day for basic communication.

Kindergarten Vocabulary Words

  1. AGE: The number of years a person or animal has lived.
  2. BURST: To cause something to break open suddenly.
  3. CARE: To keep something in a good condition; efforts to make someone or something feel safe and healthy.
  4. DELICIOUS: Enjoyable and pleasing; having a pleasant taste.
  5. EDGE: The part where an object begins or ends.
  6. FEAR: To be afraid and worried about someone or something.
  7. FIX: To make something work properly again after damage; to deal with a problem.
  8. GENTLE: Having a quiet and kind nature.
  9. HEALTHY: The quality of not feeling sick or injured; maintaining good health.
  10. INVITATION: To encourage or ask someone to perform a task or objective
  11. KNIGHT: An high-ranking soldier in the past who wears armor and rides a horse for battles.
  12. LAZY: Not liking to work hard; not having or doing much activity.
  13. MELT: To change something from a solid-state to a liquid state by applying heat.
  14. MONTH: Any one of the 12 parts into which the year is divided into.
  15. NOTE: To write or say something; to pay attention to something.
  16. PACE: The speed at which an object, thing, or person moves.
  17. PLAN: Something that a person wants to do.
  18. RACE: To compete in a running competition against someone.

These 18-words are great vocabulary starters for kids in kindergarten. It is a solid foundation for further learning.

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