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Word Of The Week

WORD OF THE WEEK – ENIGMA

WELCOME TO WORD OF THE WEEK

Through the word of the week, students will be challenged to develop and extend their vocabulary through learning and using a specific word each week.

‘Word of the Week’ sees students being introduced to a selected word every new week.  Students will be expected to learn to read the word correctly, spell it and understand its meaning.  In developing their vocabulary further they will also be taught further words of similar meaning and given examples of word use.

Each week has a word for focus, and this week we’ll be focusing on the word ‘enigma’. You can find other words of the week here

Enigma

Part Of Speech: Noun

ENIGMA

Definition:

1 : something hard to understand or explain

2 : an inscrutable or mysterious person

3 : an obscure speech or writing

Usage:

  • Despite the enigma of the singularity, the big bang theory is unquestionably one of the most successful ideas in the history of science.
  • Many scholars call it the ultimate enigma of the Nazi era, indeed perhaps of modern history: How did the Holocaust happen? And why in Germany?
  • Why she quit the team is an enigma to me.

Synonyms:

Words similar to Enigma and that can be used as substitutes/ substitutions in sentences include

closed book, conundrum, head-scratcher, mystery, mystification, puzzle, puzzlement, riddle, secret, why.

Frequently Asked Questions About enigma

  • How does the noun enigma differ from other similar words?

Some common synonyms of enigma are mystery, problem, puzzle, and riddle. While all these words mean “something which baffles or perplexes,” enigma applies to utterance or behavior that is very difficult to interpret.

Example: his suicide remains an enigma

  • When would mystery be a good substitute for enigma?

The words mystery and enigma can be used in similar contexts, but mystery applies to what cannot be fully understood by reason or less strictly to whatever resists or defies explanation.

Example: the mystery of the stone monoliths

  • When is it sensible to use problem instead of enigma?

In some situations, the words problem and enigma are roughly equivalent. However, problem applies to a question or difficulty calling for a solution or causing concern.

Example: problems created by high technology

  • Where would puzzle be a reasonable alternative to enigma?

The words puzzle and enigma are synonyms, but do differ in nuance. Specifically, puzzle applies to an enigma or problem that challenges ingenuity for its solution.

Example: the thief’s motives were a puzzle for the police

  • When is riddle a more appropriate choice than enigma?

The meanings of riddle and enigma largely overlap; however, riddle suggests an enigma or problem involving paradox or apparent contradiction.

Example: the riddle of the reclusive pop star

First Known Use of ‘enigma’

The first known use of enigma was in 1539

History and Etymology for Enigma

Latin aenigma, from Greek ainigmat-, ainigma, from ainissesthai to speak in riddles, from ainos fable

Words Related to Enigma

brainteaser, case, challenge, knot, matter, perplexity, poser, problem, stumper, trouble

SOURCES

WORD OF THE WEEK – SANGUINE

WELCOME TO WORD OF THE WEEK

Through the word of the week, students will be challenged to develop and extend their vocabulary through learning and using a specific word each week.

‘Word of the Week’ sees students being introduced to a selected word every new week.  Students will be expected to learn to read the word correctly, spell it and understand its meaning.  In developing their vocabulary further they will also be taught further words of similar meaning and given examples of word use.

Each week has a word for focus, and this week we’ll be focusing on the word ‘sanguine’. You can find other words of the week here.

SANGUINE

Part of Speech: adjective

san·​guine | \ ˈsaŋ-gwən  \

Definition of sanguine (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : marked by eager hopefulness : confidently optimistic

  • In the month of August 1994, Democrats remained sanguine about their chances at the polls …
  • A lot of attention also is being devoted to the development of vaccines to prevent genital herpes, although not everyone is sanguine about the outcome.

2 : BLOODRED

  • the radiant heat from the cedar logs, whose sanguine colour made the silvered locks of his hair into a fantastic wreath of flames.

3a : consisting of or relating to blood

  • some sanguine vessels are obstructed, and distended …

b : BLOODTHIRSTY, SANGUINARY

  • attacked by the sanguine … warriors of neighboring islands …

c : accompanied by, involving, or relating to bloodshed : BLOODY

  • From the numerous graves, including those by the barn, which our shells had destroyed; we realized what a sanguine battle it had been …

d of the complexion : RUDDY

  • She was all unnerved; her naturally sanguine complexion was pale …

4 : having blood as the predominating bodily humor

  • An abundance of red blood was marked by a warm and sanguine temperament; whereas, an excess of yellow bile produced the choleric temperament …

also : having the bodily conformation and temperament held characteristic of such predominance and marked by sturdiness, healthy red complexion, and cheerfulness

  • He conceived himself rather as a sanguine and strenuous man, a great fighter.

Part of Speech: Noun

Definition: a moderate to strong red

Synonyms for sanguine

bloodthirsty, bloody, bloody-minded, homicidal, murdering, murderous, sanguinary, sanguineous

Did You Know?

Sanguine has quite a few relatives in English. Sangfroid (“self-possession especially under strain”) and sanguineous (“bloodthirsty”) are consanguineous with sanguine. (Consanguineous, means “descended from the same ancestor.”) The tie that binds these words is sanguis, the Latin word for blood. Exsanguination (“the draining or losing of blood”), sanguinary (“murderous” or “bloody”), and the rare sangsue (“leech”) and sanguinolent (“tinged with blood”) are also sanguis relatives. That’s something you can raise a glass of sangaree or sangria (“a usually iced punch made of red wine, fruit juice, and soda water”) to.

First Known Use of sanguine

As an Adjective; 14th century.

As a Noun; 15th century.

History and Etymology for sanguine

Adjective and Noun

Middle English sanguin, from Anglo-French, from Latin sanguineus, from sanguin-, sanguis

SOURCES

WORD OF THE WEEK – SUSTAINABLE

WELCOME TO WORD OF THE WEEK

Through the word of the week, students will be challenged to develop and extend their vocabulary through learning and using a specific word each week.

‘Word of the Week’ sees students being introduced to a selected word every new week.  Students will be expected to learn to read the word correctly, spell it and understand its meaning.  In developing their vocabulary further they will also be taught further words of similar meaning and given examples of word use.

Each week has a word for focus, and this week we’ll be focusing on the word ‘sustainable’. You can find other words of the week here

Sustainable

Part of Speech: Adjective

sus·​tain·​able | \ sə-ˈstā-nə-bəl  \

Definition of sustainable

1 : capable of being sustained

2a : of, relating to, or being a method of harvesting or using a resource so that the resource is not depleted or permanently damaged

  • sustainable techniques
  • sustainable agriculture

b : of or relating to a lifestyle involving the use of

  • sustainable methods
  • sustainable society

3: able to be used without being completely used up or destroyed

4: involving methods that do not completely use up or destroy natural resources

5: able to last or continue for a long time

6: able to be maintained at a certain rate or level.

  • “Sustainable economic growth”

7: conserving an ecological balance by avoiding depletion of natural resources.

  • “our fundamental commitment to sustainable development”

8: able to be upheld or defended.

“sustainable definitions of good educational practice”

Other Words from sustainable

  • sustainability \ sə-​ˌstā-​nə-​ˈbi-​lə-​tē \ noun
  • sustainably \ sə-​ˈstā-​nə-​blē \ adverb

SYNONYMS & ANTONYMS FOR SUSTAINABLE

Synonyms

defendable, defensible, justifiable, maintainable, supportable, tenable

Antonyms

indefensible, insupportable, unjustifiable, unsustainable, untenable

Near Antonyms for sustainable

absurd, illogical, irrational, ridiculous, unsound

extreme, outrageous, unreasonable, groundless, objectionable, unacceptable, unfounded, inexplicable, unexplainable

Examples of sustainable in a Sentence

  • a line of argument that is probably not sustainable in a public forum against skilled debaters
  • ….has no sustainable claim to the property without a deed or some other document
  • The question is has the needle moved enough for substantive change to occur — and be sustainable?
  • There’s no path to a safer and more sustainable society for working people that doesn’t involve overcoming these 21st-century divide-and-conquer tactics.
  • However, to be sustainable, agriculture must provide the farmer with a living.
  • Part B outlines the new policy, which promotes sustainable agriculture, and Part C focuses on policy implementation.
  • Resolving the VAT anomaly remains the most obvious means of promoting more sustainable approaches to the housing stock

First Known Use of sustainable

In the year 1924

Words Related to sustainable

certifiable, documentable, well-founded, defensible, excusable, justifiable, vindicable, warrantable, alleged, assumed, conjectured, guessed, presumed, surmised, suspected

History and Etymology of Sustainable

The name sustainable is derived from the Latin sustinere (tenere, to hold; sub, under). Sustain can mean “maintain”, “support”, “uphold” or “endure”

Also the term’s history dates back to 1610s, “bearable,” from sustain + -able. Attested from 1845 in the sense “defensible;” from 1965 with the meaning “capable of being continued at a certain level.” Sustainable growth is recorded from 1965. Related: Sustainably.

SOURCES

Sustainably | Definition of Sustainably by Merriam-Webster. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sustainably

WORD OF THE WEEK – TEMPESTUOUS

WELCOME TO WORD OF THE WEEK

Through the word of the week, students will be challenged to develop and extend their vocabulary through learning and using a specific word each week.

‘Word of the Week’ sees students being introduced to a selected word every new week.  Students will be expected to learn to read the word correctly, spell it and understand its meaning.  In developing their vocabulary further they will also be taught further words of similar meaning and given examples of word use.

Each week has a word for focus, and this week we’ll be focusing on the word ‘tempestous’. You can find other words of the week here.

Tempestuous

Part Of Speech: Adjective

TEMPESTUOUS is an adjective. Adjectives help to qualify a subject or an object in a sentence. This means they describe characteristic of a subject or object in a sentence.

Definition:

  1. characterized by violent emotions or behaviour
  2. Of, or resembling a tempest; stormy, tumultuous.
  3. characterized by strong and turbulent or conflicting emotion.
  4. very stormy.
  5. marked by bursts of destructive force or intense activity

Usage:

  • “Safiyah can be so tempestuous!” groaned her mother.
  • “The weather this week is going to be tempestuous,” the weather man warned.
  • The Atlantic Sea is know for being tempestuous.
  • “He had a reckless and tempestuous streak”
  • “A tempestuous wind”
  • Order was restored to the court after the judge put a stop to the defendant’s tempestuous outburst
  • In terms of social change, the 1960s are generally considered the most tempestuous decade in recent American history
  • Some of you grew up in the tempestuous ’60s and were shaped by them.
  • And unlike tempestuous Italian exotica, its spacious body and four-wheel drive provide everyday performance.

Synonyms:

Words similar to Tempestuous and that can be used as substitutes/ substitutions in sentences include

turbulent

stormy

tumultuous

violent

wild

lively

heated

explosive

uncontrolled

unrestrained

feverish

hysterical

frenetic

frenzied

frantic

emotional

passionate

intense

impassioned

fiery

temperamental

volatile

excitable

mercurial

capricious

unpredictable

erratic

hot-tempered

quick-tempered

stormy

blustery

squally

Antonyms:

Words that mean the opposite of Tempestuous include

peaceful

placid

calm

Did You Know?

Time is sometimes marked in seasons, and seasons are associated with the weather. This explains how “tempus,” the Latin word for “time” could have given rise to an English adjective for things turbulent and stormy. “Tempus” is the root behind Old Latin tempestus, meaning “season,” and Late Latin tempestuosus, the direct ancestor of “tempestuous.” As you might expect, “tempus” is also the root of the noun “tempest”; it probably played a role in the history of “temper” as well, but that connection isn’t definite.

First Known Use of ‘tempestuous’

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for tempestuous

Middle English tempestuous, Latinization of tempestous, borrowed from Anglo-French, re-formation of Late Latin tempestuōsus, from tempestu-, probably extracted from Latin tempestūt-, tempestūs, archaic variant of tempestāt-, tempestās “stretch of time, season, weather, TEMPEST entry 1” + -ōsus -OUS

Words Related to tempestuous

barbarous, brutal, savage, vicious

antagonistic, hostile

aggressive, assertive, bellicose, belligerent, combative, contentious, gladiatorial, pugnacious, quarrelsome, truculent

combustible, volatile

agitated, frantic, frenzied, mad

cataclysmal (or cataclysmic), destructive, ruinous

SOURCES

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